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International Genomics Center Established in Copenhagen
Publish Date: 2010-10-24
On May 17th 2010, BGI Europe was established in Copenhagen, Denmark. BGI-Europe will provide all European partners the opportunities in technology development, production design and project development, in fields of scientific research, agriculture and bioenergy, personal healthcare etc.

 

BGI Europe has now attracted increasingly international attention to its development and growth. The following article is cited from Nordic Life Science Review.

 

International Genomics Center Established in Copenhagen

 

Source: Nordic Life Science Review     Author: Chris Tachiban

 

The powerhouse Chinese genomics center BGI announced in May 2010 that Copenhagen would be the site of its European head-quarters. BGI Europe has now opened offices at the University of Copenhagen Faculty of Life Science, and will hire 5~10 staff in the next half year, according to Mason Mak, CEO of BGI Europe. He says that if all goes well in 2011 BGI will invest USD 10 million in the Copenhagen site, including hiring additional staff. A sequencing lab may be set up in the future.

 

Well connected to Demark

 

BGI (formerly Beijing Genomics Institute)will work with scientists across Europe in the areas of basic research, personalized healthcare, agriculture and bioenergy. They offer technology research and development, product innovation and marketing, and project exploration.

 

BGI is already well connected to Denmark. They have been a partner in LUCAMP (Lundbeck Centre for Applied Medical Genomics in Personalized Disease Prediction, Prevention and Care), since it was founded in 2007 with DKK 60 million from the Lundbeck Foundation. LUCAMP uses genomics for metabolic and cardiovascular disease research. In 2009, the Sino-Danish Breast Cancer Research Centre was started as a collaboration between BGI and the University of Copenhagen, Aarhus University, the University of Southern Denmark, the Danish Technical University, and the Danish Rigshospital. In addition, Mak says,” We are definitely interested in collaborating with Novo Nordisk Foundation Metabolic Research Center,” which is scheduled to open in late 2010.

 

A global presence

 

More than 3000 people are employed at BGI’s main headquarters in Shenzhen outside of Hong Kong. Since its founding in 1999, BGI has expanded from a single genome venter to a global presence. It recently opened a site in Boston in the United State, and hopes to add centers in Southeast Asia and Australia. In addition to offering fee-for-service sequencing and bioinformatics, the non-profit institute collaborates on large-scale research projects, like the International Human Genome Project. In 2010, BGI published the giant panda genome sequence, as well as studies in collaboration with University of Copenhagen researchers on a genetic comparison of Han Chinese and Tibetans, and the genome sequence of a 4000-year old Greenland man.

 

By having offices and staff in Denmark, Mak says,”The vision is to make BGI Europe one of the largest genomic research centers for sequencing services and bioinformatics analysis in Europe.”

 

More information:

 

 

Sino-Danish Breast Cancer Research Centre: www.bcrc.dk

 

 

About Nordic Life Science Review

 

The magazine Nordic Life Science Review is the leading Nordic life science publication, devoted to give you as a reader a complete documentation of the growth and development of the Nordic life science industry, as well as outstanding research and researchers within the most important life science fields in the Nordic part of Europe.